Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Exploring an Abandoned Path

 

My son and I had the most thrilling adventure on Sunday: After shopping at Bass Pro Shop for his upcoming science fair project, we stopped by a park down the road. I'd found it on Google Maps, and I just wanted to walk around a bit to get my daily exercise and enjoy the autumn sun. Next thing I know, we happened upon this abandoned bridge over the Little Calumet River. We are enthralled.



Will the plank hold?
 

 
What lies beyond?
 
 
 
An abandoned road - for a good hour then, we explored where this overgrown path would lead us, or rather, how far we could get, plowing through thickets and climbing over fallen trees.
 
 
 
Into thickets
 
 
 
Along marbled slime...
 
 
 
...to a spooky swamp. Thankfully the sun was shining.
 
We never reached an official end, we simply tired of the thickets, but we did hear traffic and saw overhead power lines, so we weren't that for from civilization. Following this path into the woods, exploring to see where it would lead, or rather, how far we could get - it was one of those great little adventures of life. Simple, impromptu and lots of fun!
 
 
 
Eventually, we returned whence we came, proud of venturing beyond the barrier.
 
 
 
 

10 comments:

  1. Oh...darn Blogger! My comment disappeared right before I finished it. Arrgg.....
    I'll try for the Readers Digest Version: Loved this post. I would've gone along with you except for the "walking over the bridge" part. I'm not fond of any bridges, but especially one I'd have to walk on a PLANK to get to?! No way! Also loved your story "Thrown Out of the Family Home." The opening sentence is amazing: it gave me chills. I hope someday you WILL be allowed in, and that you will want to when the time comes.

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    1. Becky, thanks so much for your comment. I have to say that before I stepped on that plank, I considered the rift it was bridging, which was about 6 feet deep, so I figured if it breaks and I fall, I might break a leg, but I won't die. And I wasn't by myself.
      Thanks also for letting me know that you loved my story "Thrown Out of the Family Home." It means a lot to hear from a reader.

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  2. Kind of amazing to find an area like you've described here in the city. I'm glad that you were not there by yourself, Annette. Safety in numbers, even if only two.

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    1. Nancy, this was actually not in the city but in northwestern Indiana where you have wild places like this butting up against highways, old neighborhoods, industrial sites and new developments. Nevertheless it's still amazing to have areas like this so close to the big city of Chicago.

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  3. Now that's a journey worth taking, Annette!

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    1. William, it was indeed utterly thrilling!

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  4. Sehr abenteuerlich und auch mutig. Verwunschen und unheimlich. Gaensehaut, auch wenn Verkehrslaerm zu hoeren war. Herzklopfen, obwohl ich nicht dabei gewesen bin. Seid ihr hinter diese Barriere aus Steinen gegangen?

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    1. Barbara, ja genau, wir haben uns an dieser Betonklotzbarriere vorbeigeschwungen, man musste sich naemlich an einem umgefallenen Baum festhalten, um dann an der Brueckenseite nicht ins Nichts zu treten. Der Verkehrslaerm war erst gegen Ende unserer Wanderung zu hoeren, die erste Zeit war es schoen naturstill. Ich habe auch eine ganze Zeit lang fast erwartet, dass wir auf eine verwitterte Huette stossen, aber das aufregendste war eine graue Schlange, die sich sonnte. Alleine haette ich dies wohl eher nicht gemacht, aber zu zweit hatten wir unheimlich viel Spass.
      PS: Schoen, dich wieder hier zu haben!

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  5. What a great time of year to find a new path!

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